Marfa, Texas

This is my second trip to Marfa and I love it more than ever. Lorri Keshner and I flew to El Paso on Thursday, February 19th and drove 3 hours to Marfa – in the middle of nowhere. The drive was breathtaking and the sense of calm here is truly intoxicating. It is some of the most beautiful and humbling landscape I have ever seen in my life. I can’t begin to describe what it’s like – the vastness of the land. It might be the one place that I may be able to truly grasp the notion of infiinity. You can see forever – literally. It’s absolutely overwhelming — especially for a New Yorker!

Judd boxes against infiinity landscape

Judd boxes against infiinity landscape

On Saturday we drove the Pinto Canyon Road to Ruidosa, a tiny little town right along the Mexican border. It’s a 60 mile trip, half on paved road

Pinto Canyon Road

Lorri Kershner

and half on ridiculously unpaved road through the Pinto Canyon.

rough pinto canyon terrain

rough pinto canyon terrain

At every turn, the landscape transforms and is something entirely different than what it was around the last bend.  The drive took about 2 1/2 hours.

When we got to Riudosa, we immediately saw that the town has its own stimulus plan:

Riudosa retail

Riudosa retail

The only other “attraction” was a long-abandoned adobe church. It appears that there has been some work done to the roof, but otherwise it is a skeletal structure — the only significant one in this town of 16.

Abandoned church at Riudosa

Abandoned church at Riudosa

We turned east along the River Road, headed to Presidio, TX. Along the way we came upon this small graveyard. Most of the names are Mexican and all of the engravings are in Spanish. The graves dated from the early 1900s to about 2000 and they all face the border, towards Mexico. It would seem that in this barren and desolate countryside these people needed to bury their own dead.

Indio Ranch Cemetery

Indio Ranch Cemetery

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